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Cycle to Work


Cycle to Work

Inspired by our Dutch and Danish friends, we encourage our employees to integrate cycling into their commute where possible. Though, admittedly, the UK has a long way to go to emulate the impressive levels of cycling in Nordic counties, we believe mobilising our staff members into actively commuting is a small, yet vital step in cultivating a greener society. Beyond being a much more environmentally-conscious means of travelling to work, cycling spurs our workforce to feel happier and healthier – something, as a nutritional supplement company, we continuously strive to embody. 

In recent years, the biggest threat to sustainable development has been greenhouse gas emissions generated by transport and industry. Since transport is responsible for 22% of the UK’s carbon emissions, a shift from car use to cycling could deliver a significant reduction in transport-based pollutioni. Above all, cycling is an enormously sustainable mode of transport and, unlike its vehicular counterparts, impacts the environment minimally. As our government begins to address the pressing issue of climate change, we can anticipate non-motorised transport, like bikes, will become progressively important and integral to the solution. And we want to action that.

Pollution can have a number of insidious effects on the world around us. It has been well-documented to impact local microclimate and global climate; compromise human health, such as intensifying existing vascular, respiratory, and heart illnesses; destroy biodiversity; and ruin the built environment, including eroding buildings. Shockingly, road transport emissions are thought to contribute to 70% of air pollution in the UK’s towns and citiesii. Anything we can do to alleviate this environmental impact is well worth it. And we think cycling to work is a simple but effective weapon at a grassroots level. According to recent findings, if an employee living in Kent makes 160 cycle trips of 3.9km, it would equal a pollution-related savings of £12.98 a yeariii.

Of course, cycling offers notable physical health benefits, too. A study published in the British Medical Journal proposes cycling to work could help combat a slew of epidemics associated with obesity and inactivityiv. The long-term health benefits of cycling to work have the potential to be truly transformative.

Finally, active commuting comes with the added bonus of making our employees feel invigorated and supercharged, which, in our opinion, is an all-around brilliant way to start the working day. Cycling busts stress and anxiety, releases feel-good hormones, and allows riders to soak up mood-boosting vitamin D from the sun.

There’s no doubt cycling to work cultivates both a greener environment and a happier, healthier workforce. It couldn’t be more in line with our ethos. We will continue banging its drum in the hope of encouraging more employees to integrate this sustainable means of transportation into their commute.



References:

  1. Webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk. Valuing the benefits of cycling. A report to Cycling England. Available online: https://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20110407101006/http://www.dft.gov.uk/cyclingengland/site/wp-content/uploads/2008/08/valuing-the-benefits-of-cycling-full.pdf [Accessed 26 Feb. 2019].

  2. Webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk. Valuing the benefits of cycling. A report to Cycling England. Available online: https://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20110407101006/http://www.dft.gov.uk/cyclingengland/site/wp-content/uploads/2008/08/valuing-the-benefits-of-cycling-full.pdf [Accessed 26 Feb. 2019].

  3. Webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk. Valuing the benefits of cycling. A report to Cycling England. Available online: https://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20110407101006/http://www.dft.gov.uk/cyclingengland/site/wp-content/uploads/2008/08/valuing-the-benefits-of-cycling-full.pdf [Accessed 26 Feb. 2019].



    References:

    1. , , , , , , , , , & Association between active commuting and incident cardiovascular disease, cancer, and mortality: prospective cohort study. BMJ. p.j1456.

    2. Webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk. Valuing the benefits of cycling. A report to Cycling England. Available online: https://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20110407101006/http://www.dft.gov.uk/cyclingengland/site/wp-content/uploads/2008/08/valuing-the-benefits-of-cycling-full.pdf [Accessed 26 Feb. 2019].